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Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.145 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Печать: 1050-6934
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-4379

Выпуски:
Том 30, 2020 Том 29, 2019 Том 28, 2018 Том 27, 2017 Том 26, 2016 Том 25, 2015 Том 24, 2014 Том 23, 2013 Том 22, 2012 Том 21, 2011 Том 20, 2010 Том 19, 2009 Том 18, 2008 Том 17, 2007 Том 16, 2006 Том 15, 2005 Том 14, 2004 Том 13, 2003 Том 12, 2002 Том 11, 2001 Том 10, 2000

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v16.i6.10
pages 407-422

Surface Finish Mechanics Explain Different Clinical Survivorship of Cemented Femoral Stems for Total Hip Arthroplasty

Burak Beksac
Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York
Nicole A. Taveras
Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York
Alejandro Gonzalez Della Valle
Orthopaedic Fellow at The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; and Senior Clinical Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York
Eduardo A. Salvati
Clinical Professor Orthopaedic Surgery; Director of Hip & Knee Service. Hospital for Special Surgery Weill Medical College of Cornell University 535 East 70th Street New York NY 10021

Краткое описание

The ability of bone cement to adhere to the implant surface is dependent on the surface finish. Stems with a rough surface finish require greater force to disrupt their interface with the cement than do stems with a smooth or polished surface. However, if micromotion occurs at the cement-metal interface, the fretting of a smoother surface implant results in less cement and metallic abrasion than an implant with a rough surface finish. Today, surgeons implant femoral stems with a wide variety of surface finish and textures that are supported by the previously mentioned contrasting philosophy of fixation. This article presents the micro and macro surface finish mechanics, history, and rationale for changes in surface finish, the clinical and operative implications of changes in surface finish, the retrieval analysis, and the clinical evidence that examine the consequences of changes in surface finish in the outcome of cemented femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty. Current data and our own experience support the use of cemented femoral stems with a smooth or polished surface finish.


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