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Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Печать: 1072-8325
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-431X

Выпуски:
Том 25, 2019 Том 24, 2018 Том 23, 2017 Том 22, 2016 Том 21, 2015 Том 20, 2014 Том 19, 2013 Том 18, 2012 Том 17, 2011 Том 16, 2010 Том 15, 2009 Том 14, 2008 Том 13, 2007 Том 12, 2006 Том 11, 2005 Том 10, 2004 Том 9, 2003 Том 8, 2002 Том 7, 2001 Том 6, 2000 Том 5, 1999 Том 4, 1998 Том 3, 1997 Том 2, 1995 Том 1, 1994

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v11.i1.10
pages 1-26

"FAILING GIRLS": UNDERSTANDING CONNECTIONS AMONG IDENTITY NEGOTIATION, PERSONAL RELEVANCE, AND ENGAGEMENT IN SCIENCE LEARNING FROM UNDERACHIEVING GIRLS

Jessica J. Thompson
University of Washington, College of Education, Box 353600, Seattle, WA, 98195
Mark Windschitl
University of Washington, College of Education, Box 353600, Seattle, WA, 98195

Краткое описание

Contemporary critiques of science education have noted that girls often fail to engage in science learning because the activities lack relevance for them, and they cannot "see themselves" in the work of science. Despite the empirical support for these claims, theory around the important connections between relevance, emerging self-identity, and engagement for girls remains underdeveloped. This qualitative, exploratory investigation examines engagement in science learning among five underachieving high school girls. Data sources include in-depth interviews, classroom observations, and teacher surveys. The girls were asked to describe engagement within three learning contexts: science class, a favorite class, and an extracurricular activity. From the girls' voices emerge three themes reflecting the centrality of self: "who I am," "who I am becoming," and "the importance of relationships." It is important that these themes of self and of identity negotiation are integrated with the ways these girls find learning personally relevant. One pattern of extracurricular engagement and two patterns of science engagement (integrated and situational) are described. This study attempts to expand the dialogue around the relationships between identity, relevance, and engagement among underachieving girls and suggests ways in which curriculum can be grounded in students' lives and developing identities.