Доступ предоставлен для: Guest
Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Печать: 1072-8325
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-431X

Выпуски:
Том 25, 2019 Том 24, 2018 Том 23, 2017 Том 22, 2016 Том 21, 2015 Том 20, 2014 Том 19, 2013 Том 18, 2012 Том 17, 2011 Том 16, 2010 Том 15, 2009 Том 14, 2008 Том 13, 2007 Том 12, 2006 Том 11, 2005 Том 10, 2004 Том 9, 2003 Том 8, 2002 Том 7, 2001 Том 6, 2000 Том 5, 1999 Том 4, 1998 Том 3, 1997 Том 2, 1995 Том 1, 1994

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v11.i3.50
pages 273-294

REPORT FROM THE TRENCHES: IMPLEMENTING CURRICULUM TO PROMOTE THE PARTICIPATION OF WOMEN IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Elizabeth Jessup
Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado
Tamara Sumner
Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado
Lecia Barker
Alliance for Technology, Learning, and Society, University of Colorado

Краткое описание

Many social scientists conduct research on increasing the participation of women in computing, yet it is often computer scientists who must find ways of implementing those findings into concrete actions. Technology for Community is an undergraduate computer science course taught at the University of Colorado at Boulder in which students work with local community service agencies building computational solutions to problems confronting those agencies. Although few Computer Science majors are female, this course has consistently attracted a very large proportion of female students. Technology for Community enrollment patterns and course curriculum are compared with other computer science courses over a 3-year period. All courses that satisfy public markers of design-based learning are seen to have higher than average female enrollment. Design-based learning integrates four practices believed to increase participation of women: authentic learning context, collaborative assessment, knowledge sharing among students, and the humanizing of technology. Of all the courses marked as including design-based learning, however, the Technology for Community course is drawing the most significant numbers of women from outside of the College of Engineering and Applied Science. We attribute that success to the inclusion in the course of curriculum reflecting design-based learning and recruiting partnerships with programs outside of the College of Engineering.


Articles with similar content:

THE YOUNG WOMEN IN SCIENCE PROGRAM: A FIVE-YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF AN INTERVENTION TO CHANGE SCIENCE ATTITUDES, ACADEMIC BEHAVIOR, AND CAREER ASPIRATIONS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.15, 2009, issue 4
Kim N. Stansbury, Melody Powers Noland, Michelle Natasya Johnson, Caroline E. Reid, Sondra R. Floyd, Carl G. Leukefeld, Mitzi M. Schumacher
HOW NOVICES PERCEIVE THE CULTURE OF PHYSICS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.23, 2017, issue 2
Martin Bremer, Roxanne Hughes
A SCIENCE PIPELINE PATHWAY FOR TRAINING UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.11, 2005, issue 1
Lawrence J. Alfred, Cathie Atkins, Thelma Chavez, Paul Paolini, Vernon Avila, Michelle Lopez
EFFECTS OF AN AFTER SCHOOL ENGINEERING MENTORING PROGRAM ON MIDDLE SCHOOL GIRLS' PERCEPTIONS OF ENGINEERS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.20, 2014, issue 1
Karen High, Rebekah Hammack
EVALUATING AND EXPLORING A PROFESSIONAL CONFERENCE FOR UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN IN PHYSICS: CAN ONE WEEKEND MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.20, 2014, issue 4
Xinying Yin, Mary Mills, Gayle A. Buck, Jianlan Wang