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International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion
ESCI SJR: 0.149 SNIP: 0.16 CiteScore™: 0.29

ISSN Imprimir: 2150-766X
ISSN On-line: 2150-7678

International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion

DOI: 10.1615/IntJEnergeticMaterialsChemProp.2014011485
pages 517-557

FUEL-OXIDIZER MIXTURES: THEIR STABILITIES AND BURN CHARACTERISTICS

Jimmie C. Oxley
Chemistry Department, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02882, USA
James L. Smith
University of Rhode Island, Department of Chemistry, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881, USA
Maria Donnelly
University of Rhode Island, Department of Chemistry, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881, USA
Matthew Porter
University of Rhode Island, Department of Chemistry, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881, USA

RESUMO

A survey of the stability and performance of 11 solid oxidizers and eight fuels was performed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), simultaneous differential thermolysis (SDT), and hot-wire ignition. Fuels used in the study were sugars and alcohols as well as sulfur and charcoal; all but charcoal melted below 200°C. The goal of the study was to determine whether the oxidizer or fuel controls the essential properties of the mixture. Several general observations were made: (1) There was wide variability in DSC results, even using the same batch of a mixture. (2) SDT traces often differed markedly from those of DSC. (3) At 50 wt % sugar, decomposition generally occurred as soon as the fuel melted. (4) With only 20 wt % sucrose, many of the oxidizer/fuel mixtures still exhibited the first exotherm immediately after the melt of the fuel. This behavior was so general that we have classified the decomposition of the fuel-oxidizer mixtures as fuel or oxidizer controlled. Oxidizer-controlled mixtures were those made with KClO4, KNO3, or NH4ClO4; they did not exhibit substantial exotherms until the oxidizer underwent a phase change or decomposition. A fuel-controlled mixture meant decomposition of the mixture ensued immediately after the fuel melted. This was the case with KIO4, KIO3, KBrO3, KMnO4, KNO2, and KClO3. Fuel-controlled oxidizer/fuel mixes exhibited lower decomposition temperatures than oxidizer-controlled mixtures.


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