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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
Fator do impacto: 1.241 FI de cinco anos: 1.349 SJR: 0.519 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 1.61

ISSN Imprimir: 0731-8898
ISSN On-line: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.v29.i4.30
pages 293-315

Postexposure Prophylaxis for Deadly Bloodborne Viral Infections

Richard Edlich
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanual Hospital; and Plastic Surgery, Biomedical Engineering and Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, USA
K. Dean Gubler
Surgical Critical Care, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
Anne G. Wallis
Brush Prairie, WA, USA
Jamie J. Clark
Brush Prairie, WA, USA
Jill J. Dahlstrom
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center, Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
William B. Long III
Trauma Specialists LLP, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emmanuel Hospital Portland, OR, USA

RESUMO

The purpose of this report is to discuss management of operating room personnel who have had occupational exposure to blood and other body fluids that might contain hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). HBV postexposure prophylaxis includes starting hepatitis B vaccine series in any susceptible unvaccinated operating room personnel who sustain an exposure to blood or body fluid during surgery. Postexposure prophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) is an important consideration after determining the hepatitis B antigen status of the patient. Ideally, all operating room personnel should be vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine before they pursue their career in surgery. Immune globulin and antiviral agents (eg, interferon with or without ribavirin) should not be used for postexposure prophylaxis of operating room personnel exposed to patients with HCV; rather, follow-up HCV testing should be initiated to determine if infection develops. Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV involves a basic four-week regimen of two drugs (zidovudine and lamivudine; lamivudine and stavudine; or didanosine and stavudine) for most exposures. An expanded regimen that includes a third drug must be considered for HIV exposures that pose an increased risk for transmission. When developing a postexposure prophylaxis regimen, it is helpful to contact the National Clinicians’ Postexposure Prophylaxis Hotline, (888) 448-4911. Prevention should be a major consideration in postexposure prophylaxis with the use of the double-glove hole indication system by all operating room personnel.


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