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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN On-line: 1940-431X

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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v10.i4.30
pages 341-351

RUDIMENTS OF VETERINARY SCIENCE IN THE PRIMARY SCIENCE CURRICULUM FOR THE NOMADIC FULANI IN NIGERIA: BUILDING CURRICULAR BRIDGES FOR FUTURE CROSSINGS

G. V. Ardo
Usmanu Danfodiyo University
A. I. Daneji
Usmanu Danfodiyo University

RESUMO

A study was undertaken to discover the feelings of the children of a minority nomadic, pastoral people (the Fulani) about a primary science curriculum designed specifically for them by the federal government of Nigeria. Teachers engaged in implementing the new curriculum were chosen to be the respondents of the study. Through them, the attitudes of the children and their parents toward the new curriculum were measured. It was concluded that overwhelming evidence suggested that the Fulani children were interested in the veterinary aspects of the science curriculum. Their parents were also interested in it. Both the teachers and the children were equally motivated. The teachers, however, were less capable of handling the veterinary aspects of the curriculum. Significant chi-square values were calculated for all five null hypotheses at the p < .05 level of significance. The Fulani children were also more likely to choose veterinary careers than their sedentary counterparts who were taught through the ordinary primary science curriculum.


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