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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v12.i1.90
pages 91-98

Sensitivity of Mycogone perniciosa, Pathogen of Culinary-Medicinal Button Mushroom Agaricus bisporus (J. Lge) Imbach (Agaricomycetideae), to Selected Fungicides and Essential Oils

Ivana Potocnik
ARI Serbia, Pesticide and Environmental Research Center, Banatska 31B, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
Jelena Vukojević
Institute of Botany and Botanical Garden "Jevremovac", Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Takovska 43, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Mirjana Stajic
Institute of Botany and Botanical Garden "Jevremovac", Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Takovska 43, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Brankica Tanovic
ARI Serbia, Pesticide and Environmental Research Center, Banatska 31B, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
Emil Rekanovic
ARI Serbia, Pesticide and Environmental Research Center, Banatska 31B, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia

ABSTRACT

Four isolates of Mycogone perniciosa, separated from diseased culinary-medicinal button mushroom Agaricus bisporus fruiting bodies collected in mushroom farms in Serbia, were studied. The isolates were identified by observing their colony morphology and pathogenic characteristics. Peat/lime casing was the primary source of infection. A sensitivity test for the selected fungicides has shown that all isolates were highly sensitive to iprodione (EC50 = 3.10−4.08 mg L−1), benomyl (EC50 = 0.28−0.46 mg L−1), and, especially, prochloraz-Mn (EC50 = 0,0002−0,008 mg L−1). The minimum inhibitory concentration of prochloraz-Mn was 5 mg L−1, benomyl 10 mg L−1, and iprodione was higher than 1000 mg L−1. The same benomyl concentration had a fungicidal effect, whereas none of the tested iprodione and prochloraz-Mn concentrations were fungicidal for the M. perniciosa isolates. Among seven essential oils, Thymus vulgaris oil possessed the highest antifungal activity against the studied mycopathogen, with a minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of 0.02 μL mL−1 of air. Pistacia terebinthus essential oil demonstrated the lowest antifungal effect, with minimum inhibitory and minimum fungicidal concentrations of 0.16 and 0.65 μL mL−1 of air, respectively.


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