Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v18.i8.70
pages 713-719

Methoxyflavones from New Lingzhi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lingzhi (Agaricomycetes)

Kuniyoshi Shimizu
Division of Systematic Forest and Forest Products Sciences, Department of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Yhiya M. Amen
Division of Systematic Forest and Forest Products Sciences, Department of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt
Satoru Kaifuchi
Division of Systematic Forest and Forest Products Sciences, Department of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

ABSTRACT

Ganoderma lingzhi is one of the most famous medicinal fungi in the world. It has been used in folk medicine, especially in East Asian countries. It is also a white-rot fungus with strong wood degradation ability, especially against lignin. Different classes of bioactive natural products have been reported in Ganoderma, including triterpenes, polysaccharides, sterols, and peptides. The triterpenes and polysaccharides are the primary bioactive compounds of Ganoderma. We report for the first time the presence of 3 methoxyflavones as minor constituents in G. linghzi. The 3 compounds were identified based on different spectroscopic techniques, including 1- and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-1H correlation spectroscopy, heteronuclear single quantum coherence, and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation) and mass spectrometry (high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry). Our report provides an approach to a possible biosynthetic pathway for biosynthetic genes in the mushrooms. Another great possibility is that these compounds may exist or be formed through degradation of the components in the woody substrate, such as lignin, and then subsequently translocate to the fruiting bodies.


Articles with similar content:

Isolation and Characterization of Bioactive Metabolites from Fruiting Bodies and Mycelial Culture of Ganoderma oerstedii (Higher Basidiomycetes) from Mexico
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.17, 2015, issue 6
Jorge Suarez-Medellin, Cesar Espinoza, Manuel Norte, Angel Ramos-Ligonio, Jose J. Fernandez, Ángel Trigos, Guillermo Mendoza
Lanostane-Type Triterpenes and Abietane-Type Diterpene from the Sclerotia of Chaga Medicinal Mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (Agaricomycetes), and Their Biological Activities
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.20, 2018, issue 6
Mansor S. Mostafa Boufaris, Kutaiba Ibrahin Alzand, Sabri Ünal
Simultaneous Separation and Identification of Nucleosides in Cultured Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc. (Ascomycetes) Mycelia by Using the HPLC-DAD-MS Technique
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.8, 2006, issue 4
John Seleen, Charles Johnson, Xian-guo He
Characterization of Anti−Salmonella typhi Compounds from Medicinal Mushroom Extracts from Zimbabwe
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.21, 2019, issue 7
Catherine Chidewe, Mudadi A. Benhura, Tsungai Reid, Chenjerayi Kashangura, Takafira Mduluza, Babill Stray-Pedersen
Mycochemical Investigation of the Turkey Tail Medicinal Mushroom Trametes versicolor (Higher Basidiomycetes): A Potential Application of the Isolated Compounds in Documented Pharmacological Studies
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.17, 2015, issue 3
Yaghoub Amanzadeh, Seyed Esmaeel Sadat-Ebrahimi, Saeed Ali Mousazadeh, Emran Habibi