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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.433 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v18.i1.100
pages 83-95

Wild Edible Mushrooms from Turkey as Possible Anticancer Agents on HepG2 Cells Together with Their Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties

Gokhan Sadi
Department of Biology, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Karaman, Turkey
Abdullah Kaya
Department of Biology, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Karaman, Turkey
Hicret Asli Yalcin
Department of Biology, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Karaman, Turkey
Bugrahan Emsen
Department of Biology, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Karaman, Turkey
Aytac Kocabas
Department of Biology, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Karaman, Turkey
Deniz Irtem Kartal
Biochemistry Graduate Programme, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey
Ahmet Altay
Biochemistry Graduate Programme, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to reveal cell growth inhibitory potential of six different edible mushrooms: Ramaria flava, Agrocybe molesta, Volvopluteus gloiocephalus, Lactarius deliciosus, Bovista plumbea, and Tricholoma terreum on HepG2 cells together with their antioxidant and antibacterial power. Methanolic extracts of V gloiocephalus and aqueous extracts of R. flava had the most potential cytotoxic effects over HepG2 cells. The best results for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activities were obtained from both aqueous and methanolic extracts of R. flava. Methanolic extracts of T. terreum (IC50 = 1.62 mg/mL) and aqueous extracts of B. plumbea (IC50 = 0.49 mg/mL) showed maximum metal chelating activity. The highest reducing capacities were observed among the methanolic extracts of R. flava (EC50 = 1.65 mg/mL) and aqueous extracts of B. plumbea (EC50 = 1.71 mg/ mL). High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of many phenolic compounds in macrofungi; gallic acid and p-coumaric acid were the two main phenolics identified in all extracts. Antibacterial studies indicated that all six tested mushrooms showed antibacterial activity on at least three microorganisms. These results indicate that different extracts of the investigated mushrooms have considerable cytotoxic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties and may be utilized as a promising source of therapeutics.


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