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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.433 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2017021202
pages 667-673

Clinical Effects of a Commercial Supplement of Ophiocordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum on Cognitive Function of Healthy Young Volunteers

Sharon Tsuk
The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel
Yarden Har Lev
The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel
Arie Rotstein
The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel
Rafi Carasso
The Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel
Aviva Zeev
The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel
Yael Netz
The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel
Tzvi Dwolatzky
Rambam Health Care Campus, and Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
Gilit Steiner
The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel

ABSTRACT

Ophiocordyceps sinensis (= Cordyceps sinensis) and Ganoderma lucidum are medicinal mushrooms used in traditional Chinese medicine. The effects of O. sinensis and G. lucidum on cognitive function have been evaluated through the use of animal models and in vitro studies, which indicated beneficial effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with a commercially available supplement of O. sinensis and G. lucidum on cognitive function in young, healthy human participants. Physical education students (n = 96 [53 men, 43 women]; mean ± standard deviation age, 26.3 ± 3.21 years) were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: highdose supplement (HD) group, low-dose supplement (LD) group, and a placebo (PL) group. Each group received the treatment, administered by a technician blinded to supplements/placebo, for 30 days. Participants were evaluated for various cognitive functions before and immediately after treatment. Evaluation of cognitive function domains−global cognitive score, memory, executive function, attention, information processing speed, visuospatial ability, verbal function, and motor skills−showed no significant differences between groups. These results indicate that a combination of O. sinensis and G. lucidum supplements for 30 days did not enhance cognitive function domains in young healthy participants.


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