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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v9.i2.50
pages 151-158

Antioxidant Activity of Submerged Cultured Mycelium Extracts of Higher Basidiomycetes Mushrooms

Mikheil D. Asatiani
Animal Husbandry and Feed Production Institute Agricultural University of Georgia, 240 David Agmashenebeli Alley, 0159 Tbilisi, Georgia
Vladimir I. Elisashvili
Animal Husbandry and Feed Production Institute of Agricultural University of Georgia, 240 David Agmashenebeli alley, 0159 Tbilisi, Georgia
Abraham Reznick
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa
Eviatar D. Nevo
Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, 199 Abba Khousi Ave., Mt. Carmel, Haifa 3498838, Israel

ABSTRACT

Antioxidant properties were studied from 28 submerged cultivated mycelium Basidiomycetes strains of 25 species using the β-carotene bleaching method. Three different solvents— ethanol, water (culture liquid), and ethyl acetate—were used for extraction. The yield of extracts from biomasses depended on the mushroom species and solvent used. Water extracts from Coprinus comatus, Agaricus nevoi, and Flammulina velutipes showed high (more than 85%) antioxidant activities (AA) at 2 mg/mL. When the ethanol extracts were tested, the highest AA were found in Agaricus nevoi, Omphalotus olearius, and Auricularia auricula-judae extracts (92.1%, 83.4%, and 80.2%, respectively) at a concentration of 2 mg/mL. The AA of ethanol extracts from Agrocybe aegerita and C. comatus increased from 46.6% to 82.7% and from 2.4% to 62.1%, respectively, when the concentration of the extract increased from 2 mg/mL to 4−8 mg/mL. Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antioxidative agents and bio products.


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