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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

Impact factor: 1.357

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v11.i2.20
pages 117-131

Effect of Oral Administration of Dried Royal Sun Agaricus, Agaricus brasiliensis S. Wasser et al. (Agaricomycetideae), Fruit Bodies on Anti-β-Glucan Antibody Titers in Humans

Ken-Ichi Ishibashi
Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, Tokyo, Japan
Masuro Motoi
Toei Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 2-5-3 Iguchi, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0011; Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392, Japan
Ying Liu
Research Center for Food Safety, The University of Tokyo; Mibyou Medical Research Center, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Noriko N. Miura
Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, Tokyo, Japan
Yoshiyuki Adachi
Laboratory of Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, Tokyo, Japan
Naohito Ohno
Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, Tokyo, Japan

ABSTRACT

Agaricus brasiliensis (= Agaricus blazei Murrill sensu Heinem.) is a health food that has received recent attention. β-Glucan is one of the major components of A. brasiliensis. We have reported that an anti-β-glucan antibody was detected in sera from human volunteers. In this study, we examined the reactivity of the anti-BG antibody to A. brasiliensis extracts in human sera and change in the anti-BG antibody titer of healthy volunteers taking A. brasiliensis for 6 months (N = 27, average age = 43 ± 11, male = 13, female = 14). Individual differences in the anti-BG antibody titer existed. We evaluated the rate of change in the titer in each individual. The volunteers in the A. brasiliensis group showed an increase in the anti-BG antibody titer as compared with those in the placebo group. Individual differences existed in the rate of the increase. We first demonstrated a clinical effect of the oral administration of A. brasiliensis on the anti-BG antibody titer. The oral administration of A. brasiliensis induced a β-glucan-specific response and there were individual differences in this response. The resulting anti-BG antibody production could be useful as an index of the immune response to β-glucan in humans.