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International Journal for Multiscale Computational Engineering
IF: 1.016 5-Year IF: 1.194 SJR: 0.554 SNIP: 0.68 CiteScore™: 1.18

ISSN Print: 1543-1649
ISSN Online: 1940-4352

International Journal for Multiscale Computational Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMultCompEng.v6.i1.60
pages 65-76

Multiphysics and Multiscale Simulation: Application to a Coupled Model of the Left Ventricle and a Mechanical Heart Valve

V. Diaz-Zuccarini
University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Medical Physics, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, S10 2JF, Sheffield; University College London, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Roberts Building, Torrington Place, WC1E 7JE, London, UK
D. R. Hose
University of Sheffield, Academic Unit. of Medical Physics, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, S10 2JF, Sheffield, UK
P. V. Lawford
University of Sheffield, Academic Unit. of Medical Physics, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, S10 2JF, Sheffield, UK
A. J. Narracott
University of Sheffield, Academic Unit. of Medical Physics, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, S10 2JF, Sheffield, UK
D. Rafiroiu
Electrical Engineering Department / Biomedical Engineering Center, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 15, C. Daicoviciu Street, 400020 Cluj-Napoca, Romania

ABSTRACT

This work combines a number of diverse disciplines (physiology, biomechanics, fluid mechanics, and simulation) in order to develop a predictive model of the behavior of a prosthetic heart valve in vivo. The application of simulation to the study of other cardiovascular problems, such as blood clotting, is also discussed. A commercial, finite volume, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (ANSYS/CFX) is used for the three-dimensional (3D) component of the model. A multiscale approach is taken to produce a model of left ventricular function, from the level of the contractile proteins to the resulting ventricular pressure, to provide detailed boundary conditions for the 3D CFD model. We present results from the 3D model and discuss their implications in the context of the cavitation potential of the valve. The results suggest that the use of this approach allows us to address complex cardiovascular problems in greater detail and in a more physiologically orientated manner.