Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering
SJR: 0.207 SNIP: 0.376 CiteScore™: 0.79

ISSN Print: 0278-940X
ISSN Online: 1943-619X

Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevBiomedEng.v28.i12.170
pages 103-108

Tribological Study of Joint Pathology

La Shaun J. Berrien
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0238
Michael J. Furey
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0238
Hugo P. Veit
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0238

ABSTRACT

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common among the numerous forms of arthritides, affecting millions of people worldwide. Low-grade synovitis is an inflammatory condition commonly seen in OA. In joint fluids aspirated from patients with low-grade synovitis, increased numbers of white blood cells have been detected. During periods of prolonged inflammation, these cells may lyse, releasing lysate into the synovial fluid. The effect of this lysate on cartilage wear and damage has not been investigated previously. A lysate of bovine white blood cells was added to normal bovine synovial fluid. Both lysate treated and normal synovial fluids were used in in vitro tribological wear tests to determine the effect of the white blood cell lysate on the wear and damage of articular cartilage.
Cartilage wear increased by a factor of 2.6 when normal synovial fluid was treated with white blood cell lysate. Histology showed considerable damage and fibrillation of the lysate-treated cases, in addition to a loss of proteoglycans in the deep layer of the cartilage. The untreated control cases showed no significant damage or histological abnormalities. It is suspected that the wear and damage seen in the lysate-treated cases is partially due to enzymatic activity within the cartilage. The results of this study suggest that the products of joint inflammation, or synovitis, may have an adverse effect on cartilage wear and damage.


Articles with similar content:

Artificial Knee Implant Design Parameters Affecting the Range of Motion Improvement After Total Knee Arthroplasty
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.19, 2009, issue 1
Sudesh Sivarasu, Lazar Mathew
Endothelial Monocyte Activating Peptide II: Serum Levels in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
International Journal of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Vol.8, 2017, issue 1
Liliya A. Mogylnytska, Olesya E. Mogylnytska
PMMA Cement Allergy Misleading Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.27, 2017, issue 1
Georgios Kakouratos, Georgios Kyrou, Panayiotis D. Megaloikonomos, Evanthia Mitsiokapa, Andreas F. Mavrogenis, Panayiotis Koulouvaris, Dimitrios A. Flevas
Effect of UHMWPE Particle Size, Dose, and Endotoxin on in vitro Macrophage Response
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.24, 2014, issue 1
Carie Alley, Richard A. Smith, Warren O. Haggard
Medicinal Value of the Genus Tremella Pers. (Heterobasidiomycetes) (Review)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.2, 2000, issue 3
Sergey V. Reshetnikov, Solomon P. Wasser, Ina Duckman, Katherina Tsukor