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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.145 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v20.i4.90
pages 343-351

Programmatic Effectiveness of a University-Based Implant Training Program: Long-Term, Patient-Centered Outcomes

M. M. Farino
Private practice of periodontology, Fairbanks, AK
A. Branscum
Faculy of Health, College of Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
Fonda G. Robinson
Associate Professor of Restorative Dentistry, Department of Oral Health Practice, University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, Lexington, Kentucky
S. J. Jasper
Department of Oral Health, Practice, Chandler Medical Center, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington, KY
Mohanad Al-Sabbagh
Assistant Professor and Assistant Program Director, Graduate Periodontology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
David A. Puleo
Center for Biomedical Engineering, Wenner-Gren Lab, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
Mark V. Thomas
Department of Oral Health Practice, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Department of Oral Health Research

ABSTRACT

The University of Kentucky College of Dentistry established a formal implant program in 1999. The program utilizes a single system (Straumann) and a team concept in which implants are placed by residents in period ontology or oral and maxillofacial surgery and restored by predoctoral dental students. The program features stringent patient inclusion and exclusion criteria, incremental structured learning experiences, formal standardized protocols, and hands-on preclinical learning experiences. The use of a single system simplified training protocols and inventory requirements. Complete and partially edentulous patients requiring single and multiple implants are eligible for the program, although maxillary anterior sites are excluded. There is a formal quality assurance program to assess patient-centered outcomes. The current report includes data for patients who had implants placed in the period from January 2000 through December 2002. During that period, 192 patients received dental implants, of which 116 patients (248 implants) were available for analysis. The mean follow-up was 7.05 years (median = 7.32 years). The implant survival rate was 98.4%, while the success rate was 93.15%. Success was determined by the absence of pain or mobility, as well as self-reported patient satisfaction with function, appearance, and surgical experience.


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