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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
IF: 1.241 5-Year IF: 1.349 SJR: 0.356 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 1.61

ISSN Print: 0731-8898
ISSN Online: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.v28.i2.50
pages 133-141

Scientific Documentation of the Relationship of Vitamin D Deficiency and the Development of Cancer

Richard Edlich
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanual Hospital; and Plastic Surgery, Biomedical Engineering and Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, USA
Shelley S. Mason
Multiple Sclerosis Research Fund, Brush Prairie, WA, USA
Margot E. Chase
Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
Allyson L. Fisher
Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
K. Dean Gubler
Surgical Critical Care, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
William B. Long III
Trauma Specialists LLP, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emmanuel Hospital Portland, OR, USA
Jerry D. Giesy
The Urology Clinic, PC. Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR
Marni L. Foley
Portland Medical Clinic LLP, Beaverton, Oregon, USA

ABSTRACT

It is well known that vitamin D plays a key role in calcium homeostasis and is important for optimal skeletal growth. The major function of vitamin D is to enhance the efficiency of calcium absorption from the small intestine. Most physicians relate vitamin D deficiency to disorders of skeletal muscle. Vitamin D deficiency in children can manifest itself as rickets. In adults, vitamin D deficiency results in osteomalacia. Because most physicians do not appreciate the role of vitamin D deficiency in predisposing the development of cancer, we have written this important report as a wake-up call to physicians and other healthcare workers in documenting the relationship of vitamin D deficiency and cancer. Epidemiological data show an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and breast cancer incidence. In addition, there is a well-documented association between vitamin D intake and the risk of breast cancer. Low vitamin D intake has also been indicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. A vitamin D deficiency has also been documented in patients with prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, as well as multiple myeloma. Larger randomized clinical trials should be undertaken in humans to establish the role of vitamin D supplementation in the prevention of these cancers.


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