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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
IF: 1.625 5-Year IF: 1.63 SJR: 0.402 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 2.3

ISSN Print: 0731-8898
ISSN Online: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.v20.i3.80
7 pages

Low Levels of p53 Mutations in Indian Patients with Osteosarcoma and the Correlation with Fluoride Levels in Bone

Prakya Balakrishnamurthy
Department of Toxicology, Fredrick Institute of Plant Protection and Toxicology (FIPPAT), Padappai 601 301, Tamil Nadu, India
Kalathil Sadasivan Pillai
Department of Toxicology, Fredrick Institute of Plant Protection and Toxicology (FIPPAT), Padappai 601 301, Tamil Nadu, India
Narayanan Ramesh
Fredrick Institute of Plant Protection and Toxicology, Padappai, Tamil Nadu, India
V. Amalan Stanley
Department of Toxicology, Fredrick Institute of Plant Protection and Toxicology (FIPPAT), Padappai 601 301, Tamil Nadu, India
Bhivalal Suvas Desai
Department of Molecular Diagnostic, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York
Mayilvahanan Natarajan
MN Orthopaedic Hospital, Kilpauk, Madras 600 010, India

ABSTRACT

The pathogenesis of osteogenic sarcoma is not known. Recently, chronic fluoride exposure has been incriminated as having a possible etiologic role by causing a nonspecific osteoblast proliferation. We were interested in exploring the possible relationship between fluoride bone content and p53 mutations. We analyzed p53 mutations in various exons in tissue of osteosarcoma, and correlated the findings with the bone fluoride levels in Indian patients. We analyzed tissue samples from 20 osteosarcoma patients for possible genetic alterations including mutations, and we assessed the extent of fluoride accumulation in bone. Fragments displaying an altered electrophoretic mobility were confirmed as having mutated sequences. Mutation was observed in samples of two cases (10% incidence). Eighteen samples showed bone fluoride levels between 1000 and 27,000 ppm, whereas the 2 mutated samples showed fluoride levels of 64,000 and 89,000 ppm, respectively. The high levels of bone fluoride levels and the similarity of the mechanisms of action between fluoride-induced DNA damage and chemically-induced p53 mutations lead us to propose that high fluoride bone content might have been one of the major factors causing osteosarcoma.


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