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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Print: 1072-8325
ISSN Online: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2020026324
pages 245-262

THE INFLUENCE OF A GROWTH MINDSET INTERVENTION ON MIDDLE SCHOOL GIRLS' BELIEFS ABOUT THE NATURE OF INTELLIGENCE

Emily Dringenberg
College of Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2070 Neil Ave. Hitchcock 203, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
Chardie Baird
Kansas State University, 119 Anderson Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA
Jacqueline Spears
Women's Studies and Secondary Education, Kansas State University, 119 Anderson Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA
Sara Heiman
Kansas State University, 119 Anderson Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA
Amy Rachel Betz
Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Kansas 66506, USA

ABSTRACT

This research project explored the influence of a one-hour session on growth mindset during two offerings of a three-day science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) summer camps for middle-school girls. One hundred and two girls in grades 5−7 participated in hands-on activities provided by faculty members and graduate students from four colleges at a large, midwestern university: Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Veterinary Medicine. A quasi-experimental design was used to measure the impact of the growth mindset intervention on girls' beliefs about the nature of intelligence. Participants completed three Likert-scale items to assess their beliefs about intelligence in pre- and post- surveys. On average, participants rejected statements suggesting that intelligence is innate and their belief that intelligence can grow increased according to their responses on the pre- and post- surveys. This increase in beliefs that reflect a growth mindset was significantly greater for girls who participated in the growth mindset intervention (treatment) than for those who did not (control).

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