Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
Facteur d'impact: 1.423 Facteur d'impact sur 5 ans: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Imprimer: 1521-9437
ISSN En ligne: 1940-4344

Volumes:
Volume 21, 2019 Volume 20, 2018 Volume 19, 2017 Volume 18, 2016 Volume 17, 2015 Volume 16, 2014 Volume 15, 2013 Volume 14, 2012 Volume 13, 2011 Volume 12, 2010 Volume 11, 2009 Volume 10, 2008 Volume 9, 2007 Volume 8, 2006 Volume 7, 2005 Volume 6, 2004 Volume 5, 2003 Volume 4, 2002 Volume 3, 2001 Volume 2, 2000 Volume 1, 1999

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v7.i3.790
pages 440-441

Cultivation of Lentinus squarrosulus (Mont.) Singer on Sawdust of Selected Tropical Tree Species

John Aroye Okhuoya
Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Benin, P.M.B. 1154, Benin City, Nigeria
Emmanuel Oluwadare Akpaja
Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Benin, P.M.B. 1154, Benin City, Nigeria
Abbot Oghenekaro
Botany Department, Faculty of Science, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria

RÉSUMÉ

Lentinus squarrosulus (Mont.) Singer was cultivated on the sawdust of five economic tropical tree species. The sawdust of Chlorophora excelsa, Celtis sp., Guera cedrata, Nesogordenia papaverifera, and Brachystegia nigerica were collected during processing at the sawmill. The pure culture of the mushroom used in this study was that of strain LS001UBNIG, obtained from the mushroom bank of the Botany Department, University of Benin. The planting spawn of this mushroom was raised on a sorghum-based material. The different sawdust types were then separately sun-dried for several days until the weight became constant. The experiment had two controls. The first set of control comprised individual sawdust types without any supplement, while the second control was done by supplementing each sawdust type with 1% calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and 1% sugar. In one treatment, each sawdust type was supplemented with 1% CaCO3, 1% sugar, and 10% wheat bran. The second treatment was achieved by supplementing each sawdust type with 1% CaCO3, 1% sugar, and 20% wheat bran. The moisture content of each sawdust type was adjusted to 70%. Five replicate bags, each containing 300 g oven-dried weight equivalent of the moistened sawdust were prepared for individual sawdust type. Thereafter, the substrate-filled bags were each covered with cotton wool and steamed for 4 hours on 2 consecutive days.
The pasteurized substrates were then allowed to cool down, and subsequently, were inoculated with spawn of the mushroom at 5% level of spawning. The mushroom was able to colonize all the different substrate/supplement combinations, except the sawdust of Celtis sp., which totally failed to support the growth of the mushroom mycelium at the wheat bran supplementation of 20%. Time for mycelium colonization of the substrate ranged from 7.80 ± 0.49 days in Celtis sp., supplemented with 1% sugar, 1% CaCO3, and 1% sugar; to 17.50 ± 6.50 days in the sawdust of C. Excelsa supplemented with 1% CaCO3, 1% sugar, and 10% wheat bran. The earliest time of primordial emergence was 20.60± 0.16 days (on sawdust of B. nigerica without any addition of supplements), while the longest time (42.00 ± 1.00 days) of the same parameter was observed on the sawdust of the same tree species supplemented with 20% wheat bran. The highest yield of 16.17 was found when the sawdust was supplemented with 1% CaCO3, 1% sugar, and 10% wheat bran, while the lowest value for the same parameter was found in the sawdust of the same tree species when supplemented with 1% CaCO 3, 1% sugar, and 20% wheat bran.
The results of this study show that the mushroom Lentinus squarrosulus did not show any particular trend with an increase in the level of supplementation. Rather, in some cases, the yield of the mushroom was reduced following an increase in supplementation. The results, therefore, suggest the need for appropriate balancing of the carbon/nitrogen ratio in order to achieve maximum yield. Also, the study underscores the need for guided use of sawdust types along with the required appropriate supplements.


Articles with similar content:

Effect of Cost-Effective Substrates on Growth Cycle and Yield of Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Higher Basidiomycetes) from Northwestern Himalaya (India)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.16, 2014, issue 6
Savita Jandaik, Dharmesh Gupta, Sheetal Mehta
Yield Performance of Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.) P. Karst. (Higher Basidiomycetes), Using Different Waste Materials as Substrates
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.14, 2012, issue 5
Fatemeh Oroojalian, Majid Azizi, Maryam Tavana, Mohammad Farsi
Selenium Enrichment of Pleurotus cornucopiae (Paulet) Rolland and Grifola frondosa (Dicks.:Fr.) S.F. Gray Mushrooms
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.8, 2006, issue 1
Robert B. Beelman, Daniel J. Royse
Effect of Substrate Composition and Heat Pretreatment on Vegetative Growth of Agaricus brasiliensis S. Wasser et al. and A. subrufescens Peck
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.7, 2005, issue 3
C. Ivey, Omoanghe S. Isikhuemhen
Effects of Diets Supplemented with Medicinal Mushroom Myceliated Grains on Some Production, Health, and Oxidation Traits of Dairy Ewes
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.21, 2019, issue 1
Antonino Di Grigoli, Giuseppe Di Miceli, Maria Letizia Gargano, Felicia N. Anike, Marco Alabiso, Francesca Vitale, Giuseppe Venturella, Omoanghe S. Isikhuemhen, Massimo Todaro, Adriana Bonanno