Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering
SJR: 0.207 SNIP: 0.376 CiteScore™: 0.79

ISSN Imprimer: 0278-940X
ISSN En ligne: 1943-619X

Volumes:
Volume 47, 2019 Volume 46, 2018 Volume 45, 2017 Volume 44, 2016 Volume 43, 2015 Volume 42, 2014 Volume 41, 2013 Volume 40, 2012 Volume 39, 2011 Volume 38, 2010 Volume 37, 2009 Volume 36, 2008 Volume 35, 2007 Volume 34, 2006 Volume 33, 2005 Volume 32, 2004 Volume 31, 2003 Volume 30, 2002 Volume 29, 2001 Volume 28, 2000 Volume 27, 1999 Volume 26, 1998 Volume 25, 1997 Volume 24, 1996 Volume 23, 1995

Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevBiomedEng.v29.i3.10
pages 279-302

Viscoelasticity of the Vessel Wall: The Role of Collagen and Elastic Fibers

Frederick H. Silver
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
Istvan Horvath
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
David J. Foran
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854

RÉSUMÉ

The aortic wall contains collagen fibrils, smooth muscle cells, and elastic fibers as the primary load-bearing components. It is well known that the collagen fibrils bear loads in the circumferential direction, whereas elastic fibers provide longitudinal as well as circumferential support. Stiffening of the vessel wall is associated with loss of elastic tissue and increases in the collagen content; however, little is known about the mechanism of vessel wall stiffening with age. The purpose of this review is to attempt to relate structural changes that occur to the collagen and elastic fibers to changes in the viscoelastic behavior that are associated with aging. Analysis of the viscoelastic mechanical properties of collagen fibrils from tendon, skin, and aortic wall suggest that the collagen fibrils of aortic wall are different than those of other tissues. The elastic spring constant of the collagen fibrils in vessel walls is significantly less than that found in tendon, suggesting that the presence of type III collagen in aortic wall increases the flexibility of the collagen fibrils. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that changes in the interface between collagen fibrils, elastic fibers, and smooth muscle during aging and in connective tissue disorders leads to changes in the viscoelasticity of the vessel wall.


Articles with similar content:

Muscle Characteristics and Fatigue Properties After Spinal Cord Injury
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering, Vol.37, 2009, issue 1-2
Chelsea A. Pelletier, Audrey L. Hicks
Relationship Among Biomechanical, Biochemical, and Cellular Changes Associated with Osteoarthritis
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering, Vol.29, 2001, issue 4
Gino Bradica, Frederick H. Silver, Alfred Tria
EFFECT ON AUTOREGULATION OF THE ATERTIAL BLOOD FLOW DURING HYPERTHERMIA
International Heat Transfer Conference 16, Vol.3, 2018, issue
Yanqi Xie, Yabo Wang, Jinshan Wang, Kai Zhu
Notochordal Cells in the Adult Intervertebral Disc: New Perspective on an Old Question
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.21, 2011, issue 1
Makarand V. Risbud, Irving M. Shapiro
SPECIFICALLY TAILORED USE OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO STUDY MUSCULAR MECHANICS WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF FASCIAL INTEGRITY: THE LINKED FIBER-MATRIX MESH MODEL
International Journal for Multiscale Computational Engineering, Vol.10, 2012, issue 2
Peter A. Huijing, Can A. Yucesoy