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Critical Reviews™ in Immunology
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ISSN Imprimer: 1040-8401
ISSN En ligne: 2162-6472

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Critical Reviews™ in Immunology

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevImmunol.v27.i6.30
pages 527-537

CD8+ Memory T Lymphocytes from Bone Marrow— Immune Function and Therapeutic Potential

Aaron H. D. Wood
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201
Xiaoyu Zhang
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201
Donna L. Farber
Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201
Scott E. Strome
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201

RÉSUMÉ

Immunity to previously encountered diseases is provided in large part by memory T lymphocytes, which may be subdivided based on phenotypic and functional differences, as well as the specific cellular compartments in which these cells reside. The bone marrow (BM) is a unique microenvironment that supports robust proliferation and recall responses of both “central” and “effector” memory T cells, particularly within the CD8+ T cell subset. The recent identification within human BM of a population of CD8+ effector memory T cells with hybrid phenotype and enhanced cytotoxic function has important implications for the development of future immunotherapies. Using activated BM CD8+ memory T cells for adoptive transfer or targeting such cells with tailored vaccines may improve the ability of these classic modalities to produce potent and long-lasting antigen-specific responses, ultimately leading to clinically significant control of viral and malignant diseases.