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International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion
ESCI SJR: 0.149 SNIP: 0.16 CiteScore™: 0.29

ISSN Imprimer: 2150-766X
ISSN En ligne: 2150-7678

International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion

DOI: 10.1615/IntJEnergeticMaterialsChemProp.2012005295
pages 421-435

ACCUMULATION OF PROPELLANT RESIDUES IN SURFACE SOILS OF MILITARY TRAINING RANGE FIRING POINTS

Marianne E Walsh
US Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-1290, USA
Michael R. Walsh
US Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-1290, USA
Susan Taylor
Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-1290, USA
Thomas A. Douglas
US Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-1290, USA
Charles M. Collins
U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-1290, USA
Charles A. Ramsey
EnviroStat, Fort Collins, Colorado 80522, USA

RÉSUMÉ

Propellant residues are produced from military live-fire training, either as a by-product of the firing of weapon systems or the disposal of excess propellant charges. These residues contain energetic compounds such as 2,4-dinitrotoluene and nitroglycerin. Data on the accumulation of these compounds in surface soil were needed for environmental monitoring of potential contaminants at military training ranges in Alaska. Propellant residues from training exercises were collected and characterized. The residues consisted of discrete solid fibers or fragments of partially consumed propellant grains or flakes. Burning of excess propellant (especially on snow) left copious amounts of unburned propellant grains as well as charred residues. Sampling methods were developed and implemented to monitor the accumulation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene and nitroglycerin in the surface soils of firing points. Concentrations ranged from low parts per million of 2,4-dinitrotoluene at howitzer firing points and nitroglycerin at mortar firing points to part-per-thousand concentrations of nitroglycerin at anti-tank and 40 mm grenade firing points.


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