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International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion
ESCI SJR: 0.28 SNIP: 0.421 CiteScore™: 0.9

ISSN Imprimer: 2150-766X
ISSN En ligne: 2150-7678

International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion

DOI: 10.1615/IntJEnergeticMaterialsChemProp.v8.i4.40
pages 309-319

COMBUSTION MODES OF NANOSCALE ENERGETIC COMPOSITES

Steven F. Son
School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
Gregory M. Dutro
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 USA
Kevin M. Zaseck
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 USA
Daniel J. Vandewalle
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 USA
Robert V. Reeves
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 USA

RÉSUMÉ

Conventional composite energetic materials are typically composed of particles between 1 to 100 microns. This spatial scale places a boundary on their maximum reaction rates and, therefore, has limited their applications. Homogeneous energetic materials have reactants on the same molecule. Their performance and safety properties, however, are generally not widely tunable. In contrast, nanoscale composite energetic materials may potentially be engineered to improve reliability, control energy release rate, reduce sensitivity, enable multi-functionality, and mitigate hazards. Some nanoscale composites also have advantages for use in microscale applications. Microscale combustion is of interest in small-volume energy-demanding systems, such as power supplies, actuation, ignition, delay charges and propulsion. Here, we present an overview of recent work involving the combustion of mixtures of nanoscale composites in millimeter-scale configurations. The different modes of combustion possible in these materials are a specific focus. The combustion mode can be changed by varying the stoichiometry of the reacting material, which can allow the mixture to be used in different applications. Initial results from tube and radial slot configurations are presented that show varying combustion modes. Nanocomposites using silicon as a fuel are also of possible interest in microscale systems. Initial results of these materials are also presented.


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