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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v5.i2.40
pages 155-173

INFLUENCES OF A UNIVERSITY SUMMER RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM ON HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS' COMMITMENT TO THE SCIENCES AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Mary Monroe Atwater
The University of Georgia
John J. Colson
Charleston Southern University
Ronald D. Simpson
The University of Georgia

RÉSUMÉ

This longitudinal study focused on the effects of a 3-week summer residential program on participating students' interest in science, decisions about college or university attendance, and choice of major. Three different groups of high school students participated in the university program with the purpose of underscoring biomedical research. Pre- and posttest questionnaires were administered to the participants. At 1- and 2-year intervals after the programs, participants were sent follow-up questionnaires seeking qualitative data in the areas of secondary school performance, postsecondary institutional choices, scholarship options, choices of majors, and career options. At the end of the program, the last group demonstrated a statistically significant increase in interest toward science. Most of the participants planned to pursue professional or technical careers. There was an increase in student commitment to enroll in more than the required science courses for high school graduation, but all three groups decided to take only the required mathematics courses for high school graduation. Two years later, the first group of students ranked the following three courses as most helpful for their current secondary courses: technical communications, mathematics, and physical science. Many of the participants planned to pursue a science-related career that required additional science and mathematics courses. The summer residential program reinforced many of the participants' intentions to attend institutions of higher education and major in the sciences. The participants who decided not to major in the sciences or mathematics benefitted from their residency experiences because they chose to attend an institution of higher education.


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