Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2013004611
pages 185-208

ANALYZING SELF-REPORTED CHALLENGES AND PREFERENCES FOR ENHANCING RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF INTERNATIONAL FEMALE GRADUATE ENGINEERING STUDENTS

Soumya K. Srivastava
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
Anurag K. Srivastava
School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA
Olusola Adesope
Department of Educational Leadership and Counselling Psychology, Washington State University Pullman, Washington 99164, USA
Adrienne R. Minerick
Department of Chemical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931, USA
Noel N. Schulz
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USAl

RÉSUMÉ

Recruitment and retention of graduate students are well-recognized needs for higher education institutions. Particularly, increasing women students is one of the major priorities, as they are underrepresented, especially in engineering fields. There is a need to identify the factors influencing female students in choosing a school and handling challenges during their graduate study. This paper addresses the preferences to choose a graduate school and challenges faced by current international women graduate engineering students at US universities. An online survey was conducted and analyzed to identify female students’ concerns and influential factors before applying to or attending a graduate school. Results indicate that female students tend to choose a school on a different set of criteria compared to their male colleagues. Statistical analyses showed female students having concerns with language and culture change more than males. Furthermore, female students also reported location of university and funding opportunities as more important in choosing a school. Female graduate students reported in-school issues, such as courses, funding, and adjusting to culture, as the most challenging phase they experienced, significantly more than male students reported. There is a difference in perceptions among female and male students for choosing a school and handling challenges during graduate study. One of the key factors in increasing female students' recruitment and retention was found to be communication and mentorship. Another key factor was providing some sort of financial stability before they entered a graduate program. The main reasons female graduate students transferred to a different university were faculty issues and funding. We provide examples of how these findings can be incorporated by universities in recruitment and retention strategies to attract more international women graduate students in engineering programs.


Articles with similar content:

CONNECTING TEACHER PERCEPTIONS TO STEM OCCUPATIONAL GOALS IN LOWINCOME ADOLESCENTS OF COLOR
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.23, 2017, issue 1
Karen Moran Jackson, Kristin Emilia Harvey, Marie-Anne Suizzo
FEMALE UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING STUDENTS' PERSPECTIVES ON LABORATORY EXPERIENCES: THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL, ROLE, AND SELF IDENTITIES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.23, 2017, issue 4
Diane Silva Pimentel
RETAINING WOMEN IN THE SCIENCES: EVIDENCE FROM DOUGLASS COLLEGE'S PROJECT SUPER
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.6, 2000, issue 4
John W. Young, Jean L. Hein, Jennifer L. Fisler
THE CLIMATE FOR WOMEN GRADUATE STUDENTS IN PHYSICS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.3, 1997, issue 1&2
Christine Cassagnau, Geneva Blake, Jean M. Curtin
WOMEN AND GIRLS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS TO RECRUITMENT, RETENTION AND PERSISTENCE ACROSS THE EDUCATIONAL TRAJECTORY
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.12, 2006, issue 2-3
Natalie D. Enright Jerger, Elizabeth M. O'Callaghan