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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2013005743
pages 227-243

A MIXED METHODS STUDY OF GENDER, STEM DEPARTMENT CLIMATE, AND WORKPLACE OUTCOMES

Rebecca Riffle
Department of Psychology, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45425, USA
Tamera Schneider
Department of Psychology, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45425, USA
Amy Hillard
Department of Psychology, Adrian College, 110 S. Madison Street, Adrian, Michigan 49221, USA
Emily Polander
Department of Psychology, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45425, USA
Sarah Jackson
Department of Psychology, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45425, USA
Peggy DesAutels
Department of Philosophy, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469, USA
Michele Wheatly
Academic Affairs Administration, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6203, Morgantown, West Virginia, 26506, USA

RÉSUMÉ

The present study used a workplace climate survey (N = 252) and semi-structured interviews (N = 12) to investigate faculty perceptions of, and experiences in, their STEM departments across four diverse institutions in order to understand barriers to women's success. We found that although men and women are equally productive, women report that their department perceives them as less productive than men. Similarly, women believe they have less influence on, and experience less collegiality in, their departments than men. Women also perceive more sexism and discrimination than men. These quantitative findings are supplemented with qualitative data to more fully understand faculty perspectives. In addition, we found that workplace outcomes such as job satisfaction and turnover intentions are affected by the department climate for both men and women faculty members, which suggests that improving the climate serves all faculty members. Specific recommendations to improve STEM academic climates are discussed.


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