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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v7.i1.50
9 pages

GIRLS ENTERING TECHNOLOGY, SCIENCE, MATH AND RESEARCH TRAINING (GET SMART): A MODEL FOR PREPARING GIRLS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DISCIPLINES

P. Ruby Mawasha
College of Engineering and Computer Science, Wright State University; and Diversity in Engineering and Science, College of Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3901
Paul C. Lam
Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Diversity and Co-op Education Programs, College of Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3901
John Vesalo
Academic Achievement Programs, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-7908
Ronda Leitch
Wayne County Schools Career Center, 518 W. Prospect Street, Smithville, OH 44677-9672
Stacey Rice
Ott Staff Development Center, Akron Public Schools, Akron, OH 44301-1392

RÉSUMÉ

In this article, it is postulated that the development of a successful training program for women in science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET) disciplines is dependent upon a combination of several factors, including (a) career orientation: commitment to SMET as a career, reasons for pursuing SMET as a career, and opportunity to pursue a SMET career; (b) knowledge of SMET: SMET courses completed, SMET achievement, and hands-on SMET activities; (c) academic and social support: diversity initiatives, role models, cooperative learning, and peer counseling; and (d) self-concept: program emphasis on competence and peer competition. The proposed model is based on the GET SMART (Girls Entering Technology, Science, Math and Research Training) workshop program to prepare and develop female high school students as competitive future SMET professionals. The proposed model is not intended to serve as an elaborate theory, but as a general guide in training females entering SMET disciplines.


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