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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.5

ISSN Imprimir: 0896-2960
ISSN En Línea: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.v23.i1-4.10
pages 1-14

Assessment of Strength and Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy by GMFCS Level and Age: A Cross-Sectional Study

Sahar Hassani
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, Chicago, IL.
Joseph Krzak
Shriners Hospitals for Children−Chicago, Chicago, IL
Ann Flanagan
Shriners Hospitals for Children−Chicago, Chicago, IL
Anita Bagley
Shriners Hospitals for Children−Northern California, Sacramento, CA.
George Gorton
Shriners Hospitals for Children−Springfield, Springfield, MA.
Mark Romness
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.
Chester Tylkowski
3Shriners Hospital for Children, Lexington, KY
Mark Abel
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.
Barbara Johnson
Shriners Hospitals for Children− Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, UT
Donna Oeffinger
Shriners Hospitals for Children−Lexington, Lexington, KY

SINOPSIS

The purpose of this work is to provide comparison data for muscle strength and measures of activity and participation stratified by GMFCS level, age, and cerebral palsy (CP) type. Clinicians can use the data to determine treatment goals based on the patients' matched peer group. Methods used were data were collected on 377 individuals with hemiplegia and diplegia, GMFCS levels I−III, ages eight to18 years. Lower extremity muscle strength, Gillette gait index (GGI), one-minute walk test (1MWT), and timed up-and-go (TUG) were collected. Results showed that strength differed among GMFCS levels and age for both CP types. The GGI and 1 MWT discriminated among GMFCS levels within each CP type. The TUG discriminated between GMFCS levels I and III and levels II and III for the diplegic group. We conclude that differences in strength and measures of activity and participation were found across GMFCS levels and CP type. The reported stratified data can serve as an important clinical tool in determining realistic treatment goals and clinical outcomes.


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