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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.5

ISSN Imprimir: 0896-2960
ISSN En Línea: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.v23.i1-4.80
pages 109-123

Assessing the Applicability of the Nintendo Wii as a Device for Advancing Clinical Practice and Functional Independence

Jessica McGuire
Department of Kinesiology, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines, ON, L2S 3A1, Canada
Sander L. Hitzig
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Lyndhurst Centre, 520 Sutherland Drive, Toronto, ON, M4G 3V9, Canada; Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Health Outcomes and PharmacoEconomics (HOPE) Research
David S. Ditor
Department of Kinesiology, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines, ON, L2S 3A1 Canada

SINOPSIS

The purpose of this review was to assess the potential of the Nintendo Wii to collect clinical data such as center of pressure and weight. The use of this system as an assistive device for individuals with disability was also reviewed. Keywords including "Wii," "Nintendo Wii," "rehabilitation," and "instrumentation" were entered into the search engines Pubmed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar. Articles in English, and focusing on the use of the Nintendo Wii were reviewed. Articles focusing on the use of this system in a rehabilitation setting were excluded. In total, 260 articles were identified. After reviewing the abstracts, 13 were considered suitable for the current review (12 from Pubmed and CINAHL, 1 from Google Scholar). The Nintendo Wii, when paired with customized software, is able to collect data regarding center of pressure, weight-bearing asymmetry, and posture similar in quality to data collected by laboratory equipment. The literature is equivocal regarding the validity and reliability of data that the device can collect its own, suggesting the need for further research. When paired with custom software, the Nintendo Wii may act as an assistive device allowing individuals with disability to interact with, and respond to, environmental stimuli.


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