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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
Factor de Impacto: 1.423 Factor de Impacto de 5 años: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Imprimir: 1521-9437
ISSN En Línea: 1940-4344

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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v14.i6.30
pages 557-561

The Protective Effects of Aqueous Extracts of Wild-Growing and Fermented Royal Sun Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis S. Wasser et al. (Higher Basidiomycetes), in CCl4-Induced Oxidative Damage in Rats

Chunjing Zhang
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar Heilongjiang, PR China
Chunchao Han
School of Pharmacy, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, People's Republic of China
Baosheng Zhao
Center of Scientific Experiment, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, P.R. China
Haitao Yu
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Harbin Medical University, Heilongjiang Harbin; Department of Biology Genetics, Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar Heilongjiang, PR China

SINOPSIS

Culinary-medicinal Royal Sun mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (AbS), has traditionally been used for the prevention of a range of diseases, including cancer, hepatitis, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and dermatitis. The hepatoprotective effect of the fermented mushroom of A. brasiliensis (FMAE) and wild-growing A. brasiliensis (WMAE) were studied in this paper. An in vivo study of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced antioxidant activity in 2-month-old rats was conducted by examining the levels of activities of alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and the antioxidant enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and catalase (CAT). Rats were divided into four groups, each containing six rats. The first group served as a control group. The second group was the CCl4 group. Group I and group II were treated orally with distilled water for 14 days respectively. Group III and Group IV were treated orally by WMAE and FMAE at oral doses of 50 mg/kg-day, respectively. Both WMAE and FMAE could reduce CCl4-induced toxicity, particularly hepatotoxicity, by suppressing ALT and AST activities, and increasing antioxidant enzyme activity. The studies demonstrate that both the fermented and wild-growing A. brasiliensis could protect the liver against CCl4-induced oxidative damage in rats.