Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering
SJR: 0.26 SNIP: 0.375 CiteScore™: 1.4

ISSN Imprimir: 0278-940X
ISSN En Línea: 1943-619X

Volumes:
Volumen 48, 2020 Volumen 47, 2019 Volumen 46, 2018 Volumen 45, 2017 Volumen 44, 2016 Volumen 43, 2015 Volumen 42, 2014 Volumen 41, 2013 Volumen 40, 2012 Volumen 39, 2011 Volumen 38, 2010 Volumen 37, 2009 Volumen 36, 2008 Volumen 35, 2007 Volumen 34, 2006 Volumen 33, 2005 Volumen 32, 2004 Volumen 31, 2003 Volumen 30, 2002 Volumen 29, 2001 Volumen 28, 2000 Volumen 27, 1999 Volumen 26, 1998 Volumen 25, 1997 Volumen 24, 1996 Volumen 23, 1995

Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevBiomedEng.v28.i12.390
pages 225-230

Comparison of Heel Strike Accelerations While Walking on Carpet, Tile, and a Motorized Treadmill

Crista L. Smothers
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Memphis, 2723 Central Avenue, Memphis, TN 38111
John D. Ray
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
Gary C. Wildman
Footcare Department, Schering-Plough Corporation, Memphis, TN

SINOPSIS

The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of utilizing treadmills in human gait studies — to investigate the correlation between heel strike data obtained while walking on a treadmill to that obtained while walking on carpet and vinyl tile. The impact data were recorded using accelerometers located in the heels of tennis and casual buck shoes. Seven male subjects were tested while walking at a normal pace on the carpeted and tiled floors and then on the treadmill at that pace. Additional gait velocities were also tested on the treadmill to study the effect of velocity on heel impact. A correlation was found between heel strike accelerations on the treadmill and the ones on the tile for both shoe types. No correlation was found for the carpet. Heel strike peak accelerations increased linearly with increasing velocity on the treadmill. Results indicate that a motorized treadmill can be utilized in gait studies as long as several factors are kept in mind: the material characteristics of the shoe, the subject's stride length, the hardness of heel impact of the subject, the subject's own walking speed, and whether the subject uses a treadmill regularly.


Articles with similar content:

MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION FOR UNIDIRECTIONAL GLASS AND CARBON FIBER-REINFORCED HYBRID EPOXY COMPOSITES UNDER FLEXURAL LOADING
Composites: Mechanics, Computations, Applications: An International Journal, Vol.10, 2019, issue 1
Chensong Dong
The Effects of Footwear on Lower Extremity Joint Loading: A Literature Review
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol.26, 2014, issue 3-4
Mary Jesse
NONCONTACT MEASUREMENTS OF NORMAL DEFORMATION FIELDS OF A CONSTRUCTION SURFACE BY VIDEOGRAMMETRY METHODS WHILE STRENGTH TESTING
TsAGI Science Journal, Vol.44, 2013, issue 3
Sergey Mikhaylovich Naumov, Vladimir Petrovich Kulesh
Control of Fine Finger Function Following Stroke
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol.26, 2014, issue 1-2
Michael S. Kaplan, John Parsons, S. Mathieson, J. Slark
INTERLAMINAR SHEAR AND FLEXURAL BEHAVIOR OF MICROCHANNEL-EMBEDDED CARBON FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITES
Composites: Mechanics, Computations, Applications: An International Journal, Vol.6, 2015, issue 3
Mohsin Ali, Muhammad-Umar Saeed, Zhao Feng Chen, Bin Bin Li