Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
Forum on Immunopathological Diseases and Therapeutics
SJR: 0.309 SNIP: 0.041 CiteScore™: 0.18

ISSN Imprimir: 2151-8017
ISSN En Línea: 2151-8025

Archives: Volume 1, 2010 to Volume 7, 2016

Forum on Immunopathological Diseases and Therapeutics

DOI: 10.1615/ForumImmunDisTher.2015014226
pages 33-49

Human T-Cell Development and Thymic Egress: An Infectious Disease Perspective

Rachel S. Resop
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics; Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen Medical School at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095
Christel H. Uittenbogaart
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics; Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen Medical School at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095; University of California at Los Angeles AIDS Institute; Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen Medical School at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

SINOPSIS

Emigration of mature naive CD4 SP T cells from the human thymus to the periphery is not fully understood, although elucidation of the mechanisms that govern egress of T cells is crucial to understanding both basic immunology and the immune response in diseases such as HIV infection. Recent work has brought to light the requirement for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors in a variety of fields including mature naive T-cell egress from the thymus of mice. We are examining the expression and function of this novel requisite T-cell egress receptor within the human thymus, characterizing changes observed in the expression and function of this receptor in infectious diseases. To perform this work, we use a variety of humanized murine models reviewed in this article. Future work in the field of T-cell egress, especially as it pertains to S1P receptors, should advance the fields of basic T-cell immunology and immunopathology and open new avenues for exploration into novel therapeutics.