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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
Factor de Impacto: 1.625 Factor de Impacto de 5 años: 1.63 SJR: 0.402 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 2.3

ISSN Imprimir: 0731-8898
ISSN En Línea: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.2014011656
pages 323-337

Attenuation of Lead-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain, Liver, Kidney and Blood of Male Wistar Rats by Moringa Oleifera Seed Powder

Manoj Kumar Velaga
Department of Zoology, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530003, India
Lucius K. Daughtry
Department of Biological Sciences, Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi, USA
Angelica C. Jones
Department of Biological Sciences, Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi, USA
Prabhakara Rao Yallapragada
Department of Zoology, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530003, India
Sharada Rajanna
Department of Biological Sciences, Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi, USA
Bettaiya Rajanna
Department of Biological Sciences, Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi, USA

SINOPSIS

Moringa oleifera is a tree belonging to Moringaceae family and its leaves and seeds are reported to have ameliorative effects against metal toxicity. In the present investigation, M. oleifera seed powder was tested against lead-induced oxidative stress and compared against meso-2, 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) treatment. Male Wistar rats (100−120 g) were divided into four groups: control (2000 ppm of sodium acetate for 2 weeks), exposed (2000 ppm of lead acetate for 2 weeks), Moringa treated (500 mg/kg for 7 days after lead exposure), and DMSA treated (90 mg/kg for 7 days after lead exposure). After exposure and treatment periods, rats were sacrificed and the brain was separated into cerebellum, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and brain stem; liver, kidney, and blood were also collected. The data indicated a significant (p<0.05) increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid perioxidation products (LPP), total protein carbonyl content (TPCC), and metal content of brain regions, liver, and kidney in the exposed group compared with their respective controls. In the blood, delta-amino levulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity, RBC, WBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit showed significant (p<0.05) decrease on lead exposure. However, administration of M. oleifera restored all the parameters back to control, tissue-specifically, and also showed improvement in restoration better than DMSA treatment, indicating reduction of the negative effects of lead-induced oxidative stress.


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