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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN En Línea: 1940-431X

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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v1.i4.20
pages 273-289

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS' ATTITUDES TOWARD SCIENCE: RESEARCH AND INTERVENTION

Elizabeth Dunkman Riesz
Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Program, The University of Iowa, 233 Jessup Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242
Terry F. McNabb
Department of Education, Coe College, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402
Sandra L. Stephen
Research, Evaluation and Planning, Cedar Rapids Community School District, 346 Second Avenue SW, Cedar Rapids, IA 52404
Robert L. Ziomek
Research Division, American College Testing, Iowa City, IA 52242

SINOPSIS

As part of a six-year longitudinal project to encourage female and minority students to remain in upper division high school science courses in the Cedar Rapids Community School District (Iowa), a survey was conducted of 214 ninth-grade students to ascertain male/female perceptions of the value of science and their expectations for success in science (Eccles et al.,1983). Significant gender differences were revealed in students' task value (liking science, effort required), estimates of their ability in science, their explanations for good grades and poor grades, and their career expectations. Project planners are implementing a role model program to reduce gender discrepancies in science attitudes as these students progress through high school.


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