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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN En Línea: 1940-431X

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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v1.i2.40
pages 137-152

CHARACTERISTICS AND EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES OF HIGH-ACHIEVING MINORITY SECONDARY STUDENTS IN SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

Samuel S. Peng
National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC 20208
Susan T. Hill
Division of Science Resources Studies, National Science Foundation

SINOPSIS

The purpose of this study was to identify educational experiences, as well as home backgrounds and educational activities, that differentiate high- and low-achieving minority students in science and mathematics. Minorities here included African-Americans, Hispanics, and native-American and native-Alaskan students. A number of statistical patterns were found, using the data of the National Education Longitudinal Study of the 1988 Eighth Graders (NELS:88). For example, when related variables were jointly considered, it was found that: (1) students in affluent schools were more likely than students in other schools to be high achievers in both science and mathematics, and (2) the type of school program and course work were key variables that differentiated high and low achievers. Implications of these findings for the improvement of science and mathematics education and for the future research are discussed.


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