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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN En Línea: 1940-431X

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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2018019436
pages 325-337

THE ROLE OF SEX AND GENDER IDENTIFICATION IN STEM FACULTY'S WORK-RELATED STRESS AND EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING

Lauren Hawthorne
Rockhurst University, 1100 Rockhurst Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64110, USA
Shannon K. McCoy
University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469, USA
Ellen E. Newell
Wilkes University, 84 W South St., Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701, USA
Amy Blackstone
University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469, USA
Susan K. Gardner
University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04469, USA

SINOPSIS

Our research examines the role of sex and gender identification in the work-related stress and emotional well-being of faculty in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and non-STEM disciplines. Stereotypes of male superiority in STEM abound, and identifying strongly with gender may make women more susceptible to the consequences of this bias. We hypothesized that distancing from gender would be associated with higher well-being for women faculty in STEM. As predicted, the less gender-identified women faculty in STEM were, the better their emotional well-being and the less work-related stress they reported. These relationships were not observed for women in non-STEM disciplines. Our results suggest that gender identification is an important predictor of women's well-being in STEM and may serve as a barrier for the retention of highly gender-identified women in these fields.


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