Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression
Impact-faktor: 2.156 5-jähriger Impact-Faktor: 2.255 SJR: 0.649 SNIP: 0.599 CiteScore™: 3

ISSN Druckformat: 1045-4403
ISSN Online: 2162-6502

Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevEukarGeneExpr.v6.i2-3.60
pages 215-246

Nuclear Domains Involved in RNA Synthesis, RNA Processing, and Replication

Luitzen de Jong
E.C. Slater Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Plantage Muidergracht 12, 1018 TV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Marjolein A. Grande
E.C. Slater Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Plantage Muidergracht 12, 1018 TV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Karin A. Mattern
E.C. Slater Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Plantage Muidergracht 12, 1018 TV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Wouter Schul
E.C. Slater Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Plantage Muidergracht 12, 1018 TV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Roel van Driel
E.C. Slater Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Plantage Muidergracht 12, 1018 TV Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ABSTRAKT

Two main principles of nuclear organization have been outlined on the basis of contributions by many research groups in recent years. The first principle is that interphase chromosomes occupy discrete territories in the nucleus, with no intermingling of the DNA from different chromosomes. Within a chromosome territory the DNA is organized in chromatin fibers at several levels of folding, that meander through the territory. Transcription and replication take place at the surface of these higher order chromatin fibers, probably on locally unfolded DNA templates. The second principle is that different types of nuclear domains are associated with several specific gene loci. This holds for clusters of interchromatin granules, coiled bodies, RNA 3’ cleavage factor-containing nuclear bodies (cleavage bodies) and probably PML-containing nuclear bodies. These domains may play an important role in the spatial arrangement of genes in the interphase nucleus. Despite these new insights, our knowledge of the function of many nuclear compartments and the molecular interactions responsible for the dynamic organization of a compartmentalized nucleus is still in its infancy.


Articles with similar content:

Involvement of the Nuclear Matrix in the Control of Skeletal Genes: The NMP1 (YY1), NMP2 (Cbfa1), and NMP4 (Nmp4/CIZ) Transcription Factors
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.11, 2001, issue 4
Daniel R. Jones, Kitti Torrungruang, Kanokwan Charoonpatrapong, Janet M. Hock, Andrew J. Watt, Marta B. Alvarez, Simon J. Rhodes, Rita Shah, Joseph P. Bidwell
Nuclear Matrix Targeting of Steroid Receptors: Specific Signal Sequences and Acceptor Proteins
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.10, 2000, issue 1
Donald B. DeFranco, Jennifer Guerrero
Breakpoint Clusters: Reason or Consequence?
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.14, 2004, issue 1&2
Andrey A. Bystritskiy, Sergey V. Razin
Chromosome Territories, Interchromatin Domain Compartment, and Nuclear Matrix: An Integrated View of the Functional Nuclear Architecture
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.10, 2000, issue 2
G. Kreth, T. Cremer, I. Solovei, R. H. A. Fink, D. Zink, R. Heintzmann, M. Cremer, H. Koester, C. Cremer
Nuclear Structure, Gene Expression and Development
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.9, 1999, issue 3-4
Karen Brown