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Atomization and Sprays
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ISSN Druckformat: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

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Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v3.i3.50
pages 321-364

STRUCTURE OF VAPORIZING PRESSURE ATOMIZED SPRAYS

Vincent G. McDonell
UCI Combustion Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at Irvine, USA
G. Scott Samuelsen
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-3550, USA

ABSTRAKT

A detailed characterization of a vaporizing spray produced by a pressure atomizer is presented. The study is part of an ongoing effort to understand the behavior of sprays under a variety of conditions. The atomizer utilized is a standardized research atomizer that can be operated (without modifying the geometry of the atomizer) as either a simplex atomizer or an air-assist atomizer, with both swirling and nonswirling atomizing air, and with or without reaction. Phase Doppler interferometry, laser diffraction, and infrared extinction/ scatter are utilized in the characterization. The measurements include: (1) drop size, velocity, cross-correlations, volume flux, and concentration; (2) gas-phase velocities with and without the spray; and (3) the vapor concentration within the spray. The present data are acquired in the absence of reaction, and include temporally resolved measurements of the droplets. In the present spray, strong dependency of velocity on drop size is observed. Entrainment of surrounding air and gravitational forces lead to segregation of drops based on inertia. The result is that the modulation of the gas-phase velocities (both mean and rms) is correlated in a nontrivial way to the concentration, size, and slip velocity of the drops. The vapor concentration is saturated along the centerline of the spray, and decays in the radial direction due to the entrainment of air. The vapor concentration diffuses similarly to the gas-phase momentum. Finally, comparison of different techniques for measurement of drop size is reasonable, as is comparison of different techniques for measurement of the spray vaporization. The data presented provide a detailed set of measurements for vaporizing, pressure atomized sprays suitable for modeling challenges.


Articles with similar content:

STRUCTURE OF REACTING AND NONREACTING, NONSWIRLING, AIR-ASSISTED SPRAYS, PART II: DROP BEHAVIOR
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.3, 1993, issue 4
M. Adachi, G. Scott Samuelsen, Vincent G. McDonell
STRUCTURE OF REACTING AND NONREACTING, NONSWIRLING, AIR-ASSISTED SPRAYS, PART I: GAS-PHASE PROPERTIES
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.3, 1993, issue 4
M. Adachi, G. Scott Samuelsen, Vincent G. McDonell
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROOM-TEMPERATURE AND COMBUSTING FUEL SPRAYS NEAR THE INJECTOR TIP USING INFRARED LASER DIAGNOSTICS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.8, 1998, issue 5
Terry Parker, L. R. Rainaldi, W. T. Rawlins
EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON AIR-ASSISTED ATOMIZATION OF JATROPHA PURE PLANT OIL
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.25, 2015, issue 7
R. V. Ravikrishna, Avulapati Madan Mohan
CHARACTERISTICS OF TRANSIENT, SWIRL-GENERATED, HOLLOW-CONE SPRAYS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.16, 2006, issue 5
Julian T. Kashdan, John S. Shrimpton