Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
International Journal for Multiscale Computational Engineering
Impact-faktor: 1.016 5-jähriger Impact-Faktor: 1.194 SJR: 0.554 SNIP: 0.68 CiteScore™: 1.18

ISSN Druckformat: 1543-1649
ISSN Online: 1940-4352

International Journal for Multiscale Computational Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMultCompEng.v1.i1.20
22 pages

Multiscale Modeling of Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Lamellar g-TiAl + a2-Ti3Al Alloys

M. Grujicic
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson SC 29634-0921
G. Cao
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson SC 29634-0921
P. F. Joseph
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson SC 29634-0921

ABSTRAKT

The deformation behavior of fully-lamellar polycrystalline g-TiAl + a2-Ti3Al alloys has been analyzed using a finite element method. A three-dimensional rate-dependent, finite-strain, crystalplasticity based materials constitutive model is used to represent the deformation behavior of the bulk material. The constitutive behavior of g-TiAl/g-TiAl lamellar interfaces and lamellae-colony boundaries, on the other hand, are modeled using a cohesive-zone formulation. The interface/boundary potentials used in this formulation are determined through the use of atomistic simulations of the interface/boundary decohesion. The constitutive relations for both the g-TiAl + a2-Ti3Al bulk material and the lamellar interfaces and colony boundaries are implemented in the commercial finite element program Abaqus/Standard, within which the material state is integrated using an Euler-backward implicit formulation. The results obtained show that plastic flow localizes into deformation bands even at an overall strain level of only 0.5% and that incompatibilities in plastic flow between the adjacent colonies can give rise to high levels of the hydrostatic stress and, in turn, to intercolony fracture. Furthermore, it is found that when lamellar interfaces are admitted into colonies, fracture is delayed and the materials fail in a more gradual manner.